colinquinn:

Exfoliating Mask, 2014 ≈

colinquinn:

Exfoliating Mask, 2014 

fohk:

“Oh, I don’t know much of anything”
Eraserhead (1977)David Lynch

fohk:

Oh, I don’t know much of anything”

Eraserhead (1977)
David Lynch


Dara BirnbaumTransmission Tower: Sentinel1992vid. install. with projectors and nine screens

Dara Birnbaum
Transmission Tower: Sentinel
1992
vid. install. with projectors and nine screens

drakontomalloi:

Anonymous Flemish artist - Touch, detail. The Lady and the Unicorn series of tapestries (Musée national du Moyen Âge). Around 1484 – 1500

drakontomalloi:

Anonymous Flemish artist - Touch, detail. The Lady and the Unicorn series of tapestries (Musée national du Moyen Âge). Around 1484 – 1500

gakiyaisamu:

2011_7_b

gakiyaisamu:

2011_7_b

safety-goth:

Silicone Prosthetic 

safety-goth:

Silicone Prosthetic 

vvni:

In 1974, Joseph Beuys did a performance called I Love America, and America Loves Me where he lived in a gallery with a wild coyote for seven days as a symbolic act of reconciliation with nature. In 1996, Tracey Emin lived in a locked room in a gallery for fourteen days, with nothing but a lot of empty canvases and art materials, in an attempt to reconcile herself with paintings. Viewed through a series of wide-angle lenses embedded in the walls, Emin could be watched, stark naked, shaking off her painting demons. Starting by making images like the artists she really admired (i.e. Egon Schiele, Edvard Munch, Yves Klein), Emin’s two-week art-therapy session resulted in a massive outpouring of autobiographical images, and the discovery of a style all her own. The room was extracted in its entirety, and now exists as an installation work.
Tracey Emin
Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made (detail)

vvni:

In 1974, Joseph Beuys did a performance called I Love America, and America Loves Me where he lived in a gallery with a wild coyote for seven days as a symbolic act of reconciliation with nature. In 1996, Tracey Emin lived in a locked room in a gallery for fourteen days, with nothing but a lot of empty canvases and art materials, in an attempt to reconcile herself with paintings. Viewed through a series of wide-angle lenses embedded in the walls, Emin could be watched, stark naked, shaking off her painting demons. Starting by making images like the artists she really admired (i.e. Egon Schiele, Edvard Munch, Yves Klein), Emin’s two-week art-therapy session resulted in a massive outpouring of autobiographical images, and the discovery of a style all her own. The room was extracted in its entirety, and now exists as an installation work.

Tracey Emin

Exorcism of the Last Painting I Ever Made (detail)